When it becomes obvious that an elderly frail loved one is no longer able to care for themselves, conversations are going to become a challenge, most of all because they do not want to be uprooted from their homes and all that is familiar to them.

Even if you are going to be taking them into your home to care for them yourself, it is going to be really difficult to find the right way to broach the subject – the older we get, the more set in our routines we get, and some of our elderly loved ones can become really stubborn when faced with the complete upheaval that comes with either having to move into the family home, or to accept help in their own home, especially if they are still able to manage a few of their usual routines.

Health conditions such as severe arthritis, osteoarthritis and Parkinson’s disease complicate the situation a lot more; as frightening as it is for you to see, it is even harder for you aging family member or friend to accept these harsh realities that make simple tasks impossible to manage on their own anymore.

For the elderly frail person who is not living with Alzheimer’s or dementia and have all their faculties, it is an emotionally challenging change of life as they see their independence slipping away.  The mere fact of not being able to drive anymore and get out on their own is hard to accept, and it is issues like this that can cause a tremendous amount of strain on even the most well-intentioned family.

You want the best for your loved one but what you view as for their best does not mean the same thing to them, and this easily eats away at their sense of dignity, however, if you take the time to discuss the situation with a professional, whether it is with a social worker or a psychologist, you may find broaching all these points with your loved on a lot easier.

Not every family can afford frail care facilities, and many of them have no intention of putting their loved one into a facility, but, especially if everyone in the family is working outside of the home, it is incredibly stressful to have to leave an aging parent or elderly frail loved one on their own while you bring in the bread and butter.

What CareChamp has done is to put together a portfolio of carefully vetted caregivers, companions and registered nurses who are able to assist you and your family in keeping your loved one safe and comfortable at home, and they have made it really straightforward and simple with their flexible approach to individual care requirements.

The CareChamp management team handles all the administrative tasks for you, helps to set up an appropriate care programme as well as to make sure that each CareChamp caregiver has police clearance, health clearance and an in-depth background check, ensuring that you will feel comfortable about leaving your loved one in caring, compassionate and highly trained hands.

CareChamp has gone the distance to ensure that their services are fully comprehensive, affordable and able to fit into your schedule, whether it is on a full-time or part-time basis, or even just a few hours a day a couple of days a week.

Contact the CareChamp team to find out exactly what this highly trained and well-respected team can do to make the transition a lot easier for your family and for your elderly frail loved one, and to relieve you of the stress of leaving your loved one alone at home!